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ISSN: 1935-1232 (P)

ISSN: 1941-2010 (E)

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Case Report - Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses ( 2022) Volume 0, Issue 0

Emotional Maturity Influence in Aggressive Behavior
Mohammad Nayef Ayasrah1* and Mohamad Ahmad Saleem Khasawneh2
 
1Associate Professor of Special Education, Al Balqa Applied University/ Faculty of Educational Scienc, Jordan
2Assistant Professor, Special Education Department, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia
 
*Corresponding Author:
Mohammad Nayef Ayasrah, Associate Professor of Special Education, Al Balqa Applied University/ Faculty of Educational Scienc, Jordan, Email: [email protected]

Received: 30-Oct-2022, Manuscript No. CSRP-22-82597; Accepted Date: Nov 15, 2022 ; Editor assigned: 01-Nov-2022, Pre QC No. CSRP- 22-82597 (PQ); Reviewed: 11-Nov-2022, QC No. CSRP-22-82597 (Q); Revised: 14-Nov-2022, Manuscript No. CSRP-22-82597 (R); Published: 17-Nov-2022, DOI: 10.3371/CSRP.MMWY.100134

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to investigate whether or not there is a connection between kids' emotional development and their level of violent conduct. The correlational quantitative approach was used throughout the course of this investigation. It is possible to assess whether or not there is a connection between the independent variable, which is emotional maturity, and the dependent variable, which is violent conduct, by using this approach. This research used a method known as purposive sampling. The total number of participants that took part in this survey was 143 pupils. The findings of this study, when analyzed, indicate that there is a significant negative relationship between emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour, with a Pearson correlation value of -0.282 and a significance of 0.001 (p 0.05). This indicates that there is a significant negative relationship between emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour. While other characteristics are responsible for 71.8% of the variance in violent conduct, emotional maturity is responsible for 28.2% of the variance.

Keywords

Emotional Maturity • Aggressive behaviour • Correlation

Introduction

One has reached a condition of emotional maturity when they are able to control the outburst of their particular emotions and instead wait for the appropriate moment and setting to express those feelings in a manner that is compatible with the surrounding environment [1]. This is the condition of being able to control one's own emotional eruptions. People who have reached a mature level of emotional development not only have full control over the method in which they express their feelings, but they also pattern their behavior after the norms that are now accepted in society. A person's level of emotional maturity may be influenced by a number of factors, including their temperament, the kind of traumatic experiences they've been through, the gender and age they are, as well as the parenting style to which they were exposed [2]. The degree to which a person has grown emotionally will be reflected in the behaviors that they do in their day-to-day life.

People who have acquired a certain level of emotional maturity are able to engage in objective analysis before reacting emotionally to a situation. This indicates that they no longer act like children or like individuals who are immature and respond without first engaging in previous thinking. Instead, they no longer conduct in this manner. Emotional maturity may be defined as a person's ability to reflect on and understand their own emotions, which often results in an increased capability to control or manage those sentiments [3]. In the context of this discussion, the term "emotional control" does not mean "eradicating" or "suppressing" feelings; rather, it refers to the process by which individuals learn to exercise self-control when confronted with situations that have the potential to elicit strong emotional responses from them.

People who have emotions that are difficult to regulate or who are unable to keep their emotions under control may be able to have some effect on the behavior of others. Driving practices that are more likely to result in an accident than inexperience behind the wheel include driving above the speed limit that is posted, failing to maintain a safe following distance, and operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs [4].

nagers' emotional growth is significantly influenced by the maturation factor, which plays an important role in the process [5]. Someone who is emotionally stable is able to communicate their sentiments in a way that is acceptable to others, without going overboard, so that the sensations that they are experiencing do not interfere with other activities that they are participating in. On the other side, those who have emotional problems that aren't stable may often experience changes that are irregular and unexpected. Emotional maturity is one of the responsibilities of development that are said to take place throughout the adolescent years, [6]. Particularly, it is anticipated of adolescents that they will be tolerant and have a sense of ease, that they will be adaptable in their social interactions, that they will be interdependent, that they will have self-esteem, self-control, and the sensation of being willing to accept both themselves and others, and that they will have the ability to express their feelings in a way that is constructive and creative [7].

However, despite the fact that as teenagers get older, their cognitive abilities develop well, which enables them to deal effectively with stress or emotional fluctuations, the reality is that a significant number of teenagers are still unable to control their feelings [8]. This is despite the fact that as teenagers get older, their cognitive abilities develop well, which enables them to deal effectively with stress or emotional fluctuations. This is due to the fact that many adolescents have not been instructed on how to do these skills. The developmental difficulty of acquiring emotional maturity in terms of emotional reactivity is one that [9]. The researcher wants to know, in light of the phenomena that were addressed earlier, how much of an influence students' emotional maturity has on their inclination to participate in violent activity. This is because the researcher is interested in finding out how much of an impact it has.

Methods

The approach of research that was used in this investigation was quantitative in character and of the correlational kind. The whole population of this research, which consisted of 155 participants in total, was made up of students. The researchers decided to gather data from each and every person of the population so that they could get the most accurate results from their examination. On the other hand, due to the fact that the other participants did not satisfy the conditions that had been set, only 143 of the students who took part in this study had data that could be evaluated. For the purpose of gathering the required information, this study made use of a questionnaire that was organized along the lines of a Likert scale.

Results and Discussion

Normality Test

The results of the normality test, which are shown in Table 1, suggest that the two variables that were the subject of this investigation follow a normal distribution (sig value greater than 0.05) [10]. For the goal of guaranteeing that the requirements essential for a normal distribution are satisfied by the variables of emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour, respectively. This is done in order to ensure that a normal distribution may be achieved. A value of 0.571 has been assigned to the emotional maturity variable, which indicates that it follows a normal distribution. In addition, the value of the aggressive behaviour variable is found to be 0.367 when analyzed using the normal distribution.

Table 1. Normality Test on Collected Data

Variable KS Sig. Status
Emotional Maturity 0.784 0.571 Normal
Aggressive Behavior 0.919 0.367 Normal

Linearity Test

The results of the linearity test that were shown before showed that the value of the sig. deviation for linearity was estimated to be 0.469. This value was determined based on the findings that were presented earlier. The linearity deviation is more than 0.05 as a result of this, as shown. As a result, one may arrive at the following conclusion: the variable of emotional maturity is linearly connected to the variable of aggressive behaviour (Table 2).

Table 2. Linearity Test Result

Variable Sig. Status
Emotional Maturity_Aggressive Behaviour 0.469 Linear

Simple

oduct moment correlation test with a significance value of p that is lower than 0.05 is going to be carried out. We are able to draw the conclusion that there is a correlation between the two variables if the value of p is less than 0.05. If the value of p is higher than 0.05, then it is possible to draw the conclusion that there is no connection between the two variables. The results of the examination that was carried out to ascertain whether or not there is a connection between the qualities of emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour are shown in the table that can be seen below.

As a result of the table of correlation test results between the variables of emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour, it is known that the significance value for the relationship between the two variables of emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour is 0.001, which indicates that p is less than 0.05. This is because the significance value for the relationship is known to be 0.001. It is conceivable, on the basis of the outcomes of this correlation test, to reach the conclusion that the two variables that are being considered are associated with one another or that there is a significant relationship between emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour.

The individual correlation value is -0.282, and this number demonstrates that the level of relationship between emotional maturity and aggressive behaviour falls into the weak category and is inversely connected. Additionally, this number demonstrates that these two factors are negatively associated. Furthermore, the fact that this number is negative suggests that the correlation is negative. The fact that the Pearson correlation has a negative value (-) indicates that there is an inverse link between the two variables; people who are more emotionally mature tend to exhibit less aggressive behaviour, and vice versa. This is indicated by the fact that the value of the Pearson correlation is negative (-). The fact that the sign is in the negative position demonstrates this point. From the findings of this investigation, one may reach the conclusion that the idea that was presented is accurate (Table 3).

Table 3. Correlational Test.

Dependent Variable Independent Variable Pearson Correlation Sig.
Emotional Maturity Aggressive Behaviour -0.282 0.001

According to the findings of a study that was conducted on the connection between emotional maturity and violent behaviour in students, and the study was conducted using the SPSS for Windows application to evaluate the data collected from the students. This demonstrates that a substantial connection exists between an individual's level of emotional maturity and their level of violent conduct. A significance of 0.001 indicates that p is less than 0.05, and the Pearson correlation value for these two variables is -0.282. This indicates that the link between these two variables is unfavourable. This number shows that the amount of link between emotional maturity and aggressive conduct falls into the weak category and that there is a negative correlation between the two concepts. Because there is a correlation between the two, it follows that the more emotionally developed kids are, the less likely they are to engage in aggressive driving. On the other hand, the amount of violent conduct in a pupil is proportional to how immature their emotional development is. While other characteristics are responsible for 71.8% of the variance in violent conduct, emotional maturity accounts for 28.2% of the variance.

The majority of the pupils exhibited low levels of aggressive conduct and high levels of emotional maturity. Students often have strong talents in a variety of areas, including the ability to manage their emotions, critically analyze events, and react well when confronted with unexpected or unpleasant circumstances [11]. When riding a motorbike when impacted by negative emotions, therefore, students have a minimal risk of endangering themselves or the safety of other people on the road. The capacity of pupils to exercise self-control over their feelings demonstrates that these individuals have reached a healthy level of emotional maturity. As a result, violent conduct is seen less often and is easier to conceal in day-to-day interactions.

The individual's degree of emotional maturity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with their amount of aggressive behaviour. To put it another way, the quantity of aggressive behaviour is positively connected with a person's level of emotional maturity; conversely, the contrary is also true: the degree of aggressive conduct is adversely correlated with the level of emotional maturity of an individual [12]. When a person's emotions are completely formed and they are able to retain self-control, then that person's behaviour will also be in accordance with the norms and rules that are present in the environment that they are in. This is because the person has the ability to maintain self-control. This will make it possible for there to be a reduction in the quantity of hostile conduct.

It is often believed that those who have acquired a high degree of emotional maturity have increased cognitive capacities as well as the capacity to see difficulties in an objective way. When information is processed in the right way and with sufficient thinking, it always results in positive actions and behaviour of which behaviour is only one example. It might be challenging to provide an explanation for people's actions when those individuals make choices based only on their emotions. If you go behind the wheel when your emotions are all over the place, you endanger not just yourself but also other people on the road.

When an adolescent is considered mature or when he acts appropriately for his age, he will have a tendency to behave in accordance with the norms or rules that apply in his surroundings. This is because when an adolescent is considered mature, or when he acts appropriately for his age, he acts appropriately for his age [13]. This entails following the regulations of the traffic discipline, which enables him to have greater control over his emotions. However, if the teenager is not yet emotionally matured, he has a tendency to rapidly release his emotions wherever he is, particularly when he is out on the streets. This is especially true when the adolescent is angry or frustrated. This is due to the fact that he does not yet have the capacity to control how his sentiments are expressed.

The emotional maturity of a person reaches its pinnacle during the adolescent years, which is also a period of fast emotional development [14]. The earliest stages of adolescence are distinguished by the appearance of unfavourable feelings as well as a more irritable disposition (irritable, angry, or easily sad, and moody). Emotions that are experienced have the potential to provoke reactions in behaviour such as being combative, combative, stubborn, battling, or glad to disrupt. One further potential response is joy at the opportunity to cause a disturbance. Late adolescents, on the other hand, have matured to the point where they are able to control their feelings. The ability to cope with the pressures and demands placed upon oneself is the single most important aspect in determining whether or not a person is emotionally mature [15].

Conclusion

Students, on average, have a high degree of emotional maturity, which indicates that they have a good handle on their emotions, are able to analyze things objectively, and behave well when confronted with unexpected or upsetting circumstances. Students have a high degree of emotional maturity on average. Because the level of aggressiveness exhibited by the typical student falls into the low category, it can be deduced that the likelihood of students endangering the lives of other people on the road while driving a car or riding a motorcycle is reduced by the presence of disturbed emotions such as impatience, annoyance, hostility, frustration, or anger. This is because aggressive students are more likely to act out when their emotions are disrupted. There is a significant correlation between the degree to which a person has developed their emotional capacity and the degree to which they engage in aggressive behaviour. The amount of emotional maturity has been shown to have a significant inverse link with the level of aggressive behaviour in several cases. As a consequence of the fact that there is a connection between the two, it follows that the level of emotional development of the students has a direct influence on the degree to which they engage in aggressive behaviour. On the other hand, the degree to which students' emotional maturity contributes to their level of aggressive behaviour is directly proportionate to the severity of the problem.

Acknowledgments

The authors extend their appreciation to the Deanship of Scientific Research at King Khalid University for funding this work through Small Research Groups under grant number (RGP.2 /136/43).

References

Citation: Ayasrah MN, Saleem Khasawneh MA. "Emotional Maturity Influence in Aggressive Behaviour". Clin Schizophr Relat Psychoses 16S2 (2022) doi: 10.3371/CSRP.MMWY.100134

Copyright: 2022 Ayasrah M.N, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the creative commons attribution license which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.